Monday, August 19, 2019

Taking the stairs, one at a time



This past summer, Cookie looked at the aging clock and I will be 57 in November.  In homosexual years, I will be 97.   But I also looked at the world around me and realized that because I am at the tail end of the baby boom era, I have a lot of stuff and memorabilia that has nowhere to go when I cease to be.  Face it, I am not on the upside of the bell curve of life.

So I am sorting, and giving away a little here, and a little there.

One of the piles I gave away contained the pictures from my nursery school on Fairmount Boulevard.  These were taken in my final days at the place before I started kindergarten.   My parents had remanded their divorce in the summer of 1968 - because the first nine years weren't miserable enough, they decided to see if they could make us even more emotionally damaged than we were - and that meant my father and his Polaroid were back in the picture. The nursery school was my respite from the hate and violence that awaited me at home.  Anyway, on those final days, the old man came and took some pictures of Cookie and his friends on the final days of carefree pre-school.

The pictures are adorable, and they feature lots of students who were going different directions, but too clueless to know that meant that our friendships would cease to exist.   We all had friends in our own neighborhoods, so playdates not only hadn't been invented but were decades away from being needed.  We would go our own ways, in life and scatter to the winds.  Now, fifty-one years later, for the life of me, I can't remember any of their names.  There is a certain sadness to that piece of childhood lost.

Also lost to time is my ability to recall the name of the kind woman who oversaw the place.  She was grandmotherly, I can see her face as clear as I can look at the screen, and her shoes!  How do you forget the orthopedic oxfords that laced on the side!   God! Those caused me no amount of tsuris.  Why, why, why, these?  They were so ugly, unnatural, and had crepe soles.  Why dear God?  Like brown Earth Shoes that laced on the port on the left foot and the starboard on the right.  They were not elegant, that's for sure, but day in and out, she had those hooves on.  Besides the shoes, I remember her car.  She drove a new 1967 Plymouth Valiant two-door sedan, blue, but with redwall tires - which were a thing back then.   Even at four, I was a gearhead.

That's right, Cookie can't remember her name, but I sure as Hell remember those brown clod hopping shoes and that snazzy royal blue car of hers. Both are burned into my brain.

I can see the women who cooked our meals - they all looked like Alf from Green Acres.  And they all looked down at us with their mouths in a snarl. They didn't want us in that kitchen and we had no business even being there, but we looked, and ran off, because that's what a four-year-old does. I am sure they were lovely women, but when they did to fish patties every Friday were criminal.

The teacher's names, however: that is a different matter.

I remember Mrs. Swartz, who smiled and was wore blue dresses and had red lipstick.  And Mrs. Washington who was gentle and also kind, and exceptionally patient with us in that 3-4 age range.

Miss Frances

But most of all I remember Miss Frances.

Miss Frances, who was very young, had the job of overseeing the children who were in their final year at the school.  She was very kind and very patient and she knew which children really needed a nap, and which one or two children were well behaved enough to go to the quiet room and play with amazing toys that never left that room.  To be chosen for that quiet room was a huge honor.  I think I went once.  Most of the time I needed that nap.

For the most part, I did everything she wanted without a fuss.  For example, the before mentioned fishbricks that were black as burnt toast?  Miss Frances knew that I was never going to eat those fried fish patties, but I also knew I was never getting the chocolate pudding dessert if I didn't eat it.  She was wise enough to know that forcing me to eat that burnt fish brick was a pyrrhic victory at best, and I loved her enough that a truce was declared and weekly we negotiated, maybe one bite of the charred-black fish patty for a pudding, maybe two bites the next.  I never ate the whole thing because it was nasty.  But I did finish that pudding.   And she taught us all how to ask permission to "scrape" the food residue off the plate and into the trash when we were done.

Once, they took us downtown to the top of Cleveland's Terminal Tower - a risky endeavor, even though we were all inside a room at the top.  We rode the Rapid downtown.  The Rapid meant the Rapid Transit.  They looked just like streetcars, but Shaker Heights back then had its own private system and they were never called trolly cars: it was the Rapid.

Anyhow, to get to the rapid we had to climb down the stairs from the street level to the grade level at Green Road.  Going down the stairs I was fine.  But back then, going up the stairs at four was a challenge because I hadn't learned how to take one stair with the left foot and the next with the right.  I could do that going down the stairs, but my mind had a had time wrapping itself around that concept coming back up.

Well, Miss Frances had my hand and she was going up those stairs.  Me?  Left foot up, then the right foot onto the same stair and stop. Left foot up, then the right foot up and stop.  I was really doing my best to take the stairs as quickly as she was, but the tune I was marching too was not the same tune she was climbing to.  She stopped, watched me, and very gently encouraged me to do what she was doing.  It took a little time but I got the gist of it.  So Miss Frances taught me how to climb the stairs.  And believe me, its come in handy.

She did other things for us.  She taught us how to say "hello" and "goodbye" in French, she taught us how to keep on sharing toys and crayons when our developing minds were moving into that older childhood "MINE-set" mentality.  We knew our limits with her and we never crossed that line.  But she got us ready to move out of nursery school and ready for kindergarten, which was her job.  All in the most loving way possible.

For graduation, she dressed us each up in costume, each representing a different country.  My friend got Korea, and that honked me off because there was something about his silk costume that called my name.  But no.  I was to be a waiter from France!  Complete with a cumberbund!  How unfair, alas, but such is life, no?

On that final day, I never once thought that hug from her would be the last, or that I would never see her again.  But that was the way it went.  And today I learned that the last hug was the final hug at that.  After years of trying to spell her last name - Frances was her first name, and he last name was very eastern European and very long, so we just called Miss Frances - today I found her.  The dear woman passed away in 2004, way too young. 

The nursery school will celebrate its 100th anniversary in a couple years  - it is still going strong.  I am hoping my pictures get displayed.  I have been invited back for the event, and I will have to go.   Of course, I will be 60 that year, and the chance of any of the teachers from my era being alive is slim to none. 

But to you, Miss Frances, I say "Merci."  One day, in that place where we all go when we cease to be, we will meet up.  And I may be old, and unsure, but I will take your hand and let you lead me upward, one foot on one stair, and the other on the next, just as you taught me so long ago.  Until we meet again.

13 comments:

  1. sounds like miss frances was an oasis in your hellish life.

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  2. My memories of nursery school are much dimmer, so I think your memory is pretty good. Do you remember the name of the school? On the other hand, I have lots of memories of the Green Road Rapid Station, especially when the bridge was age-darkened stone instead of the current cement one. I recall that the grassy slopes leading down to the parking lot were loaded with wild strawberries--I didn't bother with the stairs much!
    --Jim

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    1. Green Road had that rotten dirty concrete bridge that the Van's built when they planned to take the rapid all the way out to Hunting Valley. Warrensville Center was like Green Road's bridge. You know, going back there is a weird feeling. Its like its part of me, and very familiar, but its also so far removed and distant.

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  3. Gosh. What a lot of distant memories you conjure up! Not a bad recall for a gayer aged 97... Jx

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  4. Terrific story. Brought back memories of my nursery school and Mrs. Marsh.

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    1. YAY! KellyRed has Miss Johnson, you had Mrs. Marsh and I had Miss Frances!

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  5. Oh for me it was Miss Johnson in Kindergarten. 1965. She was young, single, beautiful. I remember long black hair, a pale blue knit dress and matching headband. She taught us words and how to count in Spanish, pretty daring for a small town in Iowa LOL
    During reading time I'd make sure I got to sit next to her on the floor and I'd slowly stroke her leg because she wore nylons! Now it seems creepy, I'm not sure what she thought of it but she never told me to stop or moved her leg. She got engaged that spring.
    Both my parents were also teachers and later in my school life I got to know her better as a friend of my folks, but good heavens I was enamored of her when I was five. I love your memories Cookie and your thankfulness to Miss Francis and her kindness. More people need a Miss Francis in their lives, the world would be a better place.

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    1. Children need a safe harbor at that age. They need to explore, be taught structure, and to play nice. Second grade is when it all goes into the tank, because that's when kids start forming cliques.

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  6. That was the loveliest thing I've read in ages! How wonderful for you to share it. Sister Concepta in 1st grade had some of Miss Frances' affect on me. Although, doesn't Concepta sound like a prototype car from General Motors in the 50's?

    BrianB

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    1. I had nuns later on in my whacked out childhood. They were all Sister Marie (fill in the blank) and some of the could be nice, but there was a pyscho like Sister Mary Consulata in every group.

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  7. Oh, the Rapid. Brought to you by the VanSwaringens..........so the Rapid could bring 'the help' out to Shaker. Good times. My grandmother's cook took it all the time. I LOVED Carrie. She was so much more maternal than my grandmother.

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    1. Well, it also took father to his office, and in the old day, took mother to do her shopping. But we never took CTS buses. Oh. Hell. No.

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